DIY Create Unique Florist-Quality Arrangements For Less Than Half The Cost

WhetherDIY mini greenhouse arrangement by rlc in the pages of a glossy magazine or the window of a boutique florist, at some time you’ve spotted a gorgeous flower arrangement you’ve wished was sitting in your house. What stopped you, was it the price? Today I’ll show you how to create a stunning flower arrangement for less than half of what it would cost at your local florist shop!

I’m using a mini-greenhouse terrarium purchased at Jo-Ann’s, but you can easily substitute any container. The tips I’m sharing are from my own experience working at a florist shop where I was responsible for creating all the FTD arrangements. I’ll start us off with a list of supplies in just a moment, but first let’s talk about flowers and greenery.

A florist will often begin her arrangement by placing a fair amount of “filler” such as greenery or baby’s breath. This is done to cover the sight of the floral foam, take up space, and reduce the number of “showy” flowers used in the arrangement. The problem with this is that sometimes the “filler” can impede the desired placement of your main stems. Although you can simply pull out the filler to insert your flower, this can potentially leave holes in your foam, which could expose your flower stems to air. For this reason, I usually begin with my flowers and insert filler at the finish.

When choosing your flowers be sure to include various sizes and textures. You’ll want some single stem flowers (flowers with one long stem such as Carnations), some clusters (several blooms on one stem), some flowers that can “drape” (such as Freesia), and small flowers/greenery to tuck into any gaps. Here’s a tip for you—you might have all the “filler” greenery you need right in your own yard! Don’t be afraid to use trimmings from your own bushes.

The general rule for creating an arrangement in proportion to your container is to have the flowers equal to the height of your container, and 1 1/2 times the width. So, if my container is 6” high x 4” deep x 10” long the flower arrangement should be about 6”-8” at the highest point and drape over the edges 1” front and back and 2” or 3” on each side. Ready to have some fun?

You will need:

Wet Floral Foam
Florist’s blade or clippers
Craft blade to trim the foam
A bucket for soaking the floral foam
A bucket or vases to hold the flowers while working.

Floral Tape to secure the foam
Plastic Bag to use with any non-watertight container
Decorative Cloth to use with a see-through container
Twine to secure the lid (if using a mini greenhouse)


A few hours before working, or even the night before…

Unwrap your flower bouquets, trim a bit off of the stems, and place them in a bucket or vases to allow the flowers to perk up after being compressed. This is a great time to use the little flower-food packets included in the wrapping.

Soak the floral foam in a bucket of either plain water or water with flower food added. You can either measure the foam and trim prior to soaking, or trim it after it is fully wet. Once wet the foam is very easy to cut through.

Prepare the container…

We are ready to create our arrangement. Since my container is glass, I’m going to start by placing some burlap in the greenhouse. Next, since my container isn’t watertight I’m adding a plastic bag. mini greenhouse arrangement by rlc

Now we can insert our floral foam. The floral foam is merely a tool for holding the flowers in place so it doesn’t have to fill the entire container. In fact, you want to leave room for the water. To keep your foam from shifting, you can either place florists tape across the top in a “+” pattern or simply cut a few small squares of foam to wedge in on the sides. Be sure your foam sits a bit higher than the container so you have someplace to insert the flowers around the sides—a couple inches is fine. Add a bit of water to keep your foam wet while you work. At this point I’m trimming away the excess burlap and plastic.

Creating your arrangement…

The general rule for floral design is to keep the eye moving in a triangle. This rule can be bent depending on your container, but the key is to keep the eye moving from bottom to sides to top. This is done by using either the same flowers, flowers of the same color, or the same type of flower in similar colors. We’ll call these your main stems. In addition to your main stems, you might want to choose one or two large blooms as your focal point. Large focal blooms are usually placed low in the arrangement or even resting on the rim of the container. The objective is to make the container part of the artistic expression; you don’t want it to look like your arrangement is floating above the pot. “Draping” flowers, such as Freesia, help to blend the container into the arrangement.

Note: When using foam, flowers are trimmed and arranged just as they would be for use in a vase. You want your stems to reach to the bottom of the foam where the water is. Never enter your stems horizontally. Make your stems as long as possible. mini greenhouse stem position by rlc

Let’s begin by using a few of our cluster stems to map out the proportions. At this time you can decide if there will be a back side to your arrangement. Place one tall cluster stem in the center (or the mid-back if your arrangement will be against the wall). Next, place stems of the same flower so they reach out to the edges of where your arrangement will end on all sides. The objective is to create the “bones” of your triangle.

For those of you using a greenhouse like I am, our focus is mainly on the front of the arrangement. Since we plan on propping the lid up, let’s make sure the flowers in the back are placed far enough towards the center to be out of the way of the lid. mini greenhouse mapping size by rlc

Once you have an idea of the shape and size of your arrangement you can begin placing your main stems. It’s always more pleasing to the eye to have two or more of the same flower placed together. So, if you want the eye to follow purple mums, for instance, place two or three mums at each side and a few at the highest point. You might also place some at the mid points between these.

Next, place your focal flower(s). I’m using a sunflower. A focal flower is usually set off-center. mini greenhouse flower placement by rlc

Now you can fill in with the other stems. Remember to place more than one stem of a kind together. Vary the heights of the flowers to create depth. You’ll want to place the blooms so that they cover the stems of other flowers. This is especially true along the edges where you want the arrangement to blend with the container as a single artistic vision.

Your arrangement is almost finished. At this time, let’s fill in any blanks with our filler and greenery. Basically, you’ll want to cover any place where you can see floral foam or stems.

For those of you using a greenhouse, trim a few short pieces of greenery to cover the foam in the back. They should be short enough for the lid to clear the tops. We want anyone looking through the glass lid on the back of the arrangement to see plant material and not floral foam. mini greenhouse backside by rlc

At this point we can prop up our mini greenhouse lids. Thread one end of your twine through latch on the lower box and tie a knot. Pass the twine up through your flowers and tie it around the hook part of the latch on the lid. Continue to use your “filler” stems to conceal the twine.

Tada—you’ve created a masterpiece! mini greenhouse arrangement finish

It’s so rewarding to make your own floral arrangements. First, it’s fun to watch your own skills increase. Your friends will absolutely love receiving arrangements you made yourself. And, you can finally decorate your home like those pictures in the glossy magazines–for less than half the cost of professional floral design! I worked the figures and determined that this arrangement would have cost $162.50 at the shop where I used to work—the DIY price was a mere $45.00.

mini greenhouse side 1 by rlc  mini greenhouse side 2 by rlc


Sneaky Art Book Review and Double Giveaway!

When we get right down to it, most of us create so we can share…smiles, joy, and beauty. Quick, easy crafts not only feed our desire to create and spread smiles, they also relieve stress by giving our analytical mind a break. Today I’m sharing a little book that makes it oh, so easy to sneak a bit of art time into your day—no matter what your age. The book is Sneaky Art by Marthe Jocelyn. I’ll be passing my copy on to one lucky winner–along with an extra prize—but first, let me tell you about the book.

MarthebookcoverSneaky Art: Crafty Surprises to Hide in Plain Sight is intended for ages 8-12 but appeals to sneaky artists of all ages. The projects are inexpensive and easily adaptable for large groups, making it a good resource for teachers, but the true beauty of the book lies in the underlying lessons in conceptualization and material re-purposing. For instance, can you make a boat using only the items in the recycle bin? Jocelyn uses wine corks or milk carton bottoms…what else could you use? What can you do with cupcake papers other than cover cupcakes? How about making them into fortune cookies!

Each of the twenty-four projects in Sneaky Art are presented in a simple format listing materials needed, craft instructions, suggestions on where to “sneak” your art, and pictures of the finished pieces in their “sneaky” locations. The author offers clear instructions that “Sneaky Art is not mean, defacing, ugly, hurtful, messy, or permanent. Sneaky Art is not graffiti or marking up someone’s property. Sneaky art is funny clever, thoughtful, subversive, playful, and surprising.” Jocelyn even suggests going back to the scene of our “sneak” and retrieving our art if it is still there. To this I will add my own suggestion that any art placed outdoors be created with good stewardship in mind. We don’t want to create litter, and we don’t want to endanger any wild life. So, any paints should be non-toxic. Do not use thin threads or fishing line as they can wrap around the feet of birds and small animals causing injury. Do not use colored beads or fake berries as birds may ingest them and get sick (or worse).

Would you like to win a copy of Sneaky Art? Details on how to win today’s special double giveaway are at the end of this post.

About the Book:

Sneaky Art: Crafty Surprises to Hide in Plain Sight By Marthe Jocelyn

  • Age Range: 8 – 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 – 7
  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick (March 26, 2013)
  • Language: English


For young artists, tricksters, and crafters, here is a hip, friendly how-to manual for creating removable and shareable art projects from easily found materials. The sneaky part is in the installation! Each work of art is custom-created for display in public places — a tiny cork-bottomed boat in a public fountain, a plate of tiny paper cupcakes on your teacher’s desk, a penny left on the ground for a stranger, a funny message left on your mother’s bathroom mirror, and more. This utterly unique guide — part craft book, part art-philosophy — offers a stylish and sweet “made-you-look-twice” spirit of fun meant to put a smile on the faces of strangers and loved ones alike.

About the Author:

Marthe Jocelyn spent her childhood in Toronto reading books and putting on plays and circuses in her backyard. Marthe has a long string of jobs: theater usher, cookie seller, waitress, photo stylist, even toy designer before she finally settled on writer. She currently lives in Ontario with her daughters Nell and Hannah.

Marthe Jocelyn’s websites:

Twitter: @scissorhouse


Double Giveaway!

As part of the Sneaky Art virtual book tour through Women OnMarthebookcover Writing, I am offering a double-prize package consisting of my hardcover, review copy of Sneaky Art and a Rainy Day Art Pack by Marthe Jocelyn.

The Rainy Day Art Pack comes with a body template and a selection of scraps for crafting (decorative paper, pompoms, feathers, yarn, buttons, etc…) Just add glue and scissors! More fun than paper dolls (remember them?) Where will this little character end up? He/she might become part of a collage…or even take part in a “sneaky art” caper!  Rainy Day Artpack

To Enter The Giveaway:

Leave a Comment: Tell us about a time you took part in a sneaky art caper OR tell us about something wonderful you or your child created with re-purposed items OR tell us why this book appeals to you. Make sure your email address is either in your profile or included in your comment so I can get in touch with you!

For additional Entries:

Tweet about this giveaway. Come back and leave the url to your tweet. Be sure to use the hashtag #SneakyArt in your tweet! (Each tweet gains an additional entry!)

Follow @scissorhouse on Twitter (and let us know)

Follow @RCchrps (that’s me) on Twitter (and let us know)

Visit A Ponderance of Things on Sunday, December 15th for more chances to win this Double Giveaway!

Contest runs December 13, 2013 through December 21, 2013. One random winner will be chosen from all entries gathered on Museiddity and A Ponderance of Things. One winner will win the prize package consisting of one hardcover copy of the book, Sneaky Art, and one Rainy Day Art Pack. Items to be mailed separately. Winner to be notified by email and posted in a blog update.

Good Luck!

Update: Congratulations to Pillows-a-la-mode for winning our Sneaky Art double prize! She has been contacted via email 🙂

Last Minute Centerpiece: Pumpkin Bouquet-Candle

pumpkin bouquet candle by rlcIt’s down to the wire for your Thanksgiving meal and your table looks under-dressed. The big question is…candles or flowers? Why settle for either one when you can have both? This bouquet-candle centerpiece is quick and easy to make. All you need is a small pumpkin, some dried rice, flowers, and a tea light!

When making a pumpkin bouquet one usually places a can or jar inside the pumpkin to act as a vase. Today’s bouquet-candle is different; the flowers go into the sides of the pumpkin and the tea light sits in the top. It’s really quick to make but will only last two days.

Craft Materials: pumpkin bouquet candle materials

  • 1 small pumpkin or other squash
  • Flowers (I suggest flowers that will sit close to the fruit—small mums work well)
  • ¼ – ½ cup dried rice
  • 1 tea light
  • Knife and scoop for cutting top off pumpkin and removing seeds
  • Awl or other sharp tool for holes (I used a Phillips screwdriver)
  • Vegetable peeler for rounding out top opening (optional)

Craft Steps:

  • Place dried rice in a small bowl and add water to cover. Allow to soak. Meanwhile…
  • Cut the top off your pumpkin, being careful not to puncture the bottom of the fruit. Remove pumpkin seeds and flesh
  • Round out the opening with the vegetable peeler
  • Poke holes for the flowers using the awl or other pointy tool. You will want to stay above the mid-line. Keep in mind that all flower stems should aim down to the bottom center of the pumpkin. Trypumpkin bouquet candle stems two rows of alternating punctures or, for a more classic look, make evenly-lined punctures only in the ribs of the fruit (as seen in the picture below).
  • Trim the flower stems and place the flowers in the holes. If you feel any resistance it might be fleshy strings on the inside of the fruit; simply scrape them away.
  • Strain the rice and carefully spoon it into the pumpkin, tapping lightly so it fills the entire chamber. pumpkin bouquet candle fill
  • Even off the top.
  • Seat the tea light in center.pumpkin bouquet candle alternative

Sending Warm Blessings for Your Thanksgiving Holiday

Gobble-Gobble Gourdy: A Quickly Crafted Critter

Gourd Turkey by rlcMeet Gobble-Gobble Gourdy. Created from a fresh gourd and an old pine cone, Gourdy will happily guard your display of Thanksgiving pies or take respite under a colorful fall bouquet.



Craft Materials:Gobble Gobble Gourdy set up

  • 1 colorful gourd, fresh or dried
  • 1 large pine cone with open seed scales
  • 1 small cone
  • Hot glue gun
  • Small saw or bolt cutter for severing stem


Craft Steps:

Determine how your gourd will sit and where you want to attach the head. Heat up your glue gun.

Using the largest pine cone, break or cut the very end of the fattest section. This will be the tail section of your turkey. (Note: The stem of a pine cone is quite tough so be prepared to build up an appetite.) Hot glue this end piece to the largest end of the gourd.

Gobble Gobble Gourdy back

From the remains of the large pine cone, pull off a few of the larger scales. These will be the tall tail feathers. Hot glue them to the sloping part of the gourd just above the end piece.

Glue the small pine cone into place at the small end of the gourd. This will be the turkey’s head.

Gourd Turkey front view by rlcnt

Add a snood for detail: (The snood is the fleshy part that hangs over a turkey’s beak.) From the remains of the large pine cone, pull off one small scale. Glue this onto one side of the turkey’s head.


DIY Gypsy Lamps (and a Giveaway)

Today is my final guest post over at Samhain’s Sirens. We’ll be making Gypsy Lamps and giving away a lovely lilac colored necklace with amethysts and moonstones. I’m happily sharing the craft post with you here, but to enter the giveaway you’ll need to go to the Samhain’s Sirens blog and enter by Monday morning at 6:00 am EDT. Here is a picture of the necklace being offered.

Creations by RLC widget pic

Gypsy Lamps

They say lighting sets the mood. Whether your style is gypsy or ghoul, you can completely transform your home and have light anywhere with the magic of an LED light specifically made for paper lanterns. LED Paper Lantern Light

Craft Materials:

  • Paper Lantern LED light (available at most craft stores–$9.99)
  • Three AAA batteries
  • Plastic bottle to use as the lamp shade
  • Craft knife or scissors
  • Cord, ribbon, or twine (length needed to tie around your LED and pass through your shade plus about 1 ft for gathering fabric. If you will be using the same cord for hanging the lamp include that measurement.)
  • Fashion chain (optional, for hanging lamp)
  • One or more large scarves or cuts of fabric for covering lampshade (old, torn & dyed pillow cases or rags will work as well)
  • Twist tie to help secure fabric around the shade (optional)
  • Twig or piece of wire to hold LED light (optional depending on type of bottle used)
  • Craft Paint or Wax Paper and tape (optional)

Craft Steps:

Choose your lamp shade.

The item you choose will ultimately determine the size and shape of your lantern. It should be sturdy enough to support the fabric and be at least three inches in diameter. Some ideas include the end of a 2 ½ gallon water jug, the bottom of a laundry detergent bottle, or a plastic sports bottle. Depending on which end of the bottle you use you will pass your hanging ribbon through either a small cut in the bottle or the neck of the bottle. If passing through the neck you will need to craft a support for your LED out of a twig or piece of wire. I’ll show an example of each version.

Prepare your bottle.

Remove any labels from your bottle. Decide which part of the bottle you will use and cut it down to the desired size. If the plastic is completely clear you can make it more opaque by taping large strip of wax paper around the bottle or applying a light coat of craft paint.

Place the batteries in the LED and insure it is working.

Measure your cord.

You will need enough cord to tie around the clip of the LED and pass back through the shade. To determine the length, measure from the top of your shade to the point at which you want the LED to hang. The length of cord needed will be twice this amount plus 10 inches if using a separate cord or chain for hanging. If using the same cord for hanging, figure the additional length needed into your measurement.

Version 1: Using the end of a bottle

Cut a small “x” in the center for means of threading the hanging cord.

Tie the cord around the clip of the LED, centering the LED on the cord.

Gypsy Lamp LED tie off

Decide how far above the LED you want the shade to sit and tie a knot at that point. Pass the ends of the cord through the underside of your shade (through the “x”) until the shade rests on the knot.

Gypsy Lamp thread through

If hanging your lamp directly from this cord, tie another knot just above your shade (so the cord does not fall back through. Braid or bead the remaining length of cord, forming a final loop at the end to allow for placement on a hook.

If you will be adding a separate hanging chain, create a small loop just above the shade to which you will attach your hanging chain

Version 2: Using the top of a bottle

Cut a piece of twig or wire to fit snug just below the neck of the bottle; this will act as a harp to support the shade.

Gypsy Lamp harp

Tie the cord around the clip of the LED.  Decide how far above the LED you want the shade to sit and tie a loose knot. Insert your twig through the knot and tighten. Pass the ends of the cord through the neck of the bottle until the shade rests on the twig.

If hanging your lamp directly from this cord, braid or bead the remaining length of cord and finish off with a loop to allow for placement on a hook.

If you will be adding a separate hanging chain, create a small loop just above the shade to which you will attach your hanging chain.

Drape the fabric.

Gathering and draping the fabric is easier to do while the lamp is hanging—allowing you to use both hands!  Play with the layers of fabric until you like the way it drapes. Secure with a twist tie either just above your shade (for Version 1) or around the bottle neck (Version 2).  Add a decorative ribbon or cord and you have a fabulous, magical (no outlet necessary), hanging lamp!

DIY Gypsy Lamp

No Glue Burlap Wreath Dressed Up for Fall

Fall Burlap Wreath by RLCI finally invited autumn into our home. To me, a wreath is a sign of welcome and prosperity; an invitation for each season to share her gifts. So today, I re-dressed my No Sew No Glue Burlap Wreath in the colors of the season.

For those of you who missed the original post, below is a picture of my summer wreath. The beauty of this wreath is that it is so easy to change it up for each season or holiday. By creating decoration “picks” there is no need for glue. You can make the wreath as thick and “poufy” as you like just by altering the amount of material you use, how many sections you create and how much you “pouf” the fabric. (Click here for original instructions).  Burlap Wreath Summer by RLCA

For the fall makeover I removed all the buttons and ribbons from the original wreath. Next, I chose two types of ribbon—tucking one end of each under the wire behind the burlap fabric at the bottom (you could also pin the ends in place). I brought the ribbons around the wreath, tying them into place with some twine.

Imitation flowers tucked under the same hidden wire behind the fabric at the bottom along with a pick made from some fall leaves (clipped from a garland) create the focal point. The makeover took about ten minutes.

Burlap Wreath Fall Focal by RLC

Check Out Another Easy Wreath
This one is made in the same way but with wired stems that twist into place! Autumn Burlap Wreath by RLC

Do you enjoy making wreaths? Tell us about your favorite! What types of base do you prefer? Silk flowers or dried? Is there a family story that goes along with your wreath?

What’s on Your Craft Bench?

On the Workbench by rlcI thought I’d take a moment to share some of the of the things I’ve been working on and invite you to share your own projects.

Lately, I’ve been in jewelry mode. I decided to create some resin pendants using Halloween-themed pictures I drew a few years ago. It’s fun to take the original illustration and use photo editing to apply different techniques–each pendant comes out unique!

Red Flight bracelet by RLCJust to show the difference, here is a picture of bats flying with the moon in the background. But in one version the moon seems to be bleeding (and has an extra bat), the other (in the picture below) is more sepia toned.


On the Workbench Items by rlc

I reverse-painted some clear pendants and ended up with some really neat effects! I especially like the blue one (in the picture here), but there was a lovely, shimmering lilac colored pendant that became the focal for this necklace.

Creations by RLC widget pic

I’ll be adding the finished projects to my shop as I go along. I just recently added these two. One is original artwork in resin, the other is a Dia De Los Muertos lariat necklace featuring hand-formed and hand painted clay skulls. Passkey and Los Muertos by RLCby RLC

So, that’s what’s on my bench right now–what’s on your bench? Are you making crafts for Halloween or stitching gifts for Christmas? Are you trying something new? Do you have a craft to share? Let us know!





Create an Eerie Gallery of Illuminated Picture Boxes

Illuminated Picture Boxes for HalloweenBe the curator of your own ghostly museum! These DIY light boxes are a fun way to light up your hallway, bathroom, or fireplace mantel.

I shared this craft last Friday with the folks at Samhain’s Sirens but thought it was so fun I’d re-post the craft here!


Craft Materials:

  • Empty boxes—one for each illuminated picture. These will be your frames.
  • Ruler to measure the “window” size for your print.
  • Item to trace for “window” (optional)
  • Vellum for printed picture (about .99 cents at the craft store; scrapbook section)
  • Computer and computer printer for printing picture onto vellum
  • Paint, pretty paper, or other embellishments to decorate frame
  • Craft knife or scissors
  • Tape
  • Glow stick or battery operated light source. (I used the submersible LED lights I talked about in Light Up Your Party. They have a clip on the back to hold them onto the box/frame)


Craft Steps:

Choose an empty box—an empty cereal box or tissue box will work nicely. Tape closed any open ends and cut a large opening out of the back side of the box.

Illuminated Picture Boxes one

Lay the box face down and measure or trace your desired picture window opening (I used the lid to a can). Cut out the opening.

Illuminated Picture Boxes two

Measure your window to determine the needed size of your printed picture. If you will be painting your box you might do this now so it has time to dry.

Illuminated Picture Boxes three

Using your computer, choose a photograph or illustration to print. You might want to manipulate the image using photo editing software. Save the image.

Decide how you will print the image and print a test page on regular paper.

How you print the image depends on your equipment. I use my Word program and insert the image onto a document. The rulers on my screen help me to size the image.

Check your test page against the window you cut from your box. If you are happy with the size then print a final copy onto a piece of vellum. Note: Vellum does not take ink as well as regular printing paper, so be prepared to allow a few minutes of drying time. Your image might have roller lines or other ink imperfections but that just adds character to your final work. (wink*)

Cut out your image allowing enough of a border for taping to the box.

Samhain Greetings by RLC

Place your box front down on a table. Place your image face down inside the box. Check the placement to be sure the image is correctly positioned in the window. Tape the image to the inside of the box.

Illuminated Picture Boxes five

Finish decorating your frame. When the time comes to illuminate your box simply tape a glow stick—those little sticks you break and shake—or a small, battery operated light source to the inside bottom ledge of your box.

Illuminated Picture Boxes Samhain Greetings

I’d love to see your gallery! Send me a note or leave a comment if you want to share your picture boxes with Museiddity readers.

Light Up Your Party!

You have your decorations up, your costume made, and your menu planned—have you thought about your lighting? When planning your Halloween gathering your choice of lighting is as important as your menu. After all, nothing ruins a mood faster than turning on the lights! This means your lighting needs to pull double duty—provide atmosphere and enough light for people to see by. One of the most versatile lighting options I’ve found is the submersible LED.

Basically, these are bright, tiny flashlights that possess a watertight seal when turned on—perfect for illuminating potions or specimen jars! You’ll findSubmersible LED Lights submersible LED lights in the floral section of your local craft store. Available in several colors, they turn on with a simple twist of cap and some of them have a handy clip on the back to allow for more flexible placement options.

Your buffet table is the perfect place to begin planning your lighting. How do you create a mood and keep the food looking appetizing while using a minimum amount of space? Illuminated jars will serve you well here by providing both light and acting as raised pedestals for serving dishes. Fill a few jars with water and place a submersible LED in each jar. You can add food coloring to the water, some fresh herbs for an underwater effect, or plastic body parts. Cover the jars with lace or gauzy fabric for a more muted light.

Submersible Lights in Buffett SettingA

The bathroom provides another lighting challenge. Try adding a couple of submersible LED lights to a vase of flowers; in addition to a fairly bright light the flowers will provide a nice shadow effect. (Tip: add purple or black food coloring to the water and the flowers will turn a darker color.) Illuminated jars will work here as well; try tucking one out of site behind the toilet or filling the shower with specimen jars. If you have a tub, fill the tub with colored water and anchor a few of these LED lights in the bottom. Create a scene in the tub—maybe a gruesome mask amongst floating vines.

The tiny size of these lights allows you to tuck them just about anywhere; they don’t have to be in water. Clip them to your other decorations, hide them on top of the cabinets…let your imaginations go! Just don’t let the dog eat them.

Best Intentions…Interrupted

I had so many plans for September–fill my shop for the holidays, share some terrific Halloween crafts, host a contest,…. then the bug from Hades came to visit (seriously, it’s going on three weeks now!) So, October may not be as grand as I originally intended, but I plan to move forward and share what I can.  In the meantime, you can join me each Friday in October over at Samhain’s Siren’s.

Samhain is the Celtic New Year, and the precursor to what we now call Halloween. Samhain’s Sirens is a fun group of  people joined by the common love of the season. Each Friday in October I’ll be sharing a craft and hosting a giveaway.  Come on by! There will be recipes, gifts, and stories to celebrate the season.